Information

Iowa state university horticulture extension

Iowa state university horticulture extension


Iowa state university horticulture extension service

As the only statewide extension service in the state of Iowa, the Iowa State University (ISU) Horticulture program provides educational support to ISU faculty and students in the study and application of horticulture and the horticultural industries. It is the only academic service in the state of Iowa and one of several statewide Extension Service horticulture programs. The service's primary mission is to enhance horticultural research, education, and extension through collaborative partnerships with industry and other professional horticultural organizations. The program also focuses on community outreach programs that focus on improving the public's access to a horticultural knowledge base.

Services

The ISU Horticulture extension service includes the following programs:

Iowa State University Plant Identification &, Herbarium Program

Iowa State University Certified Nursery Grower Program

Iowa State University Nursery Testing Program

Iowa State University Landscape Architecture Program

Iowa State University Crop Consultant &, Master Gardener Program

Iowa State University Crop Rotation &, Tillage Programs

Iowa State University Agricultural Information Technology Program

Iowa State University Horticulture Greenhouse Program

Iowa State University Horticulture Master Gardener Program

Iowa State University Iowa Master Gardener Program

Iowa State University Plant Science Program

Iowa State University Crop Science Research Program

History

1939-1942

The Extension Service in horticulture began as the Extension Bureau in 1939, when Iowa State Teachers College, now the Iowa State University, was still a branch of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas (AMCT), now Texas A&,M University. The Extension Bureau was created to develop methods for teaching the basic principles of agriculture, such as land preparation, crop protection, soil improvement, animal husbandry, and dairy management. Horticulture was included as a part of the Extension Service, but had no established methods or curriculum at that time. The first coordinator of the Horticulture Bureau was Harry L. Johnson of the Extension Bureau, who would later become dean of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Iowa State and a Professor of Horticulture. With the opening of the new school year in 1939, the Extension Bureau adopted the name Extension Service.

1945-1952

In 1946, with the establishment of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, the Extension Bureau (now Extension Division) became an independent unit within the college. The Extension Bureau of the University of Iowa also adopted a name change to the Extension Service in 1947. In 1948, the Iowa State University horticulture program began as a minor on campus, under the supervision of the Department of Plant Industry.

1952-1955

The Horticulture program began formal course work in 1952-53. Dr. E.J. Gossman served as the first Horticulture Extension Agent. The Iowa State University Plant Science Laboratory opened for the first time in 1955, where graduate student Frank Schacht and undergraduate students, such as James L. Stigall, would later work on many projects for the Extension Service.

1955-1963

The first course in horticulture was available to freshmen students starting in 1955. By the end of the 1960s, the program had grown to serve nearly 30,000 students, as well as teachers and staff. In the 1960s, the Extension Service adopted a "One-Stop" approach, which provided a one-stop resource for all horticultural information. The name of the Horticulture Program was changed to College of Agricultural and Life Sciences Horticulture Program in 1961.

1963-1966

In 1963, the Horticulture Program became part of the new Cooperative Extension Service. The Extension Service adopted the name Cooperative Extension Service in 1966.

A new Horticulture Division opened in 1969, focusing on plant science. In the 1970s, the Cooperative Extension Service adopted a "One-Stop" approach for all horticultural information.

1988-1995

In 1988, the Cooperative Extension Service launched a two-year initiative called the Great Green Thumb in response to the increased interest in gardening. The program was aimed at helping gardeners select plants and grow their own vegetables.

In 1995, the Horticulture Division adopted a new name of the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources (CASNR) Horticulture Program.

1996-2000

In 1996, the name was changed to the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Horticulture Program.

2000-2007

In 2000, the Horticulture Program was accredited by the American Horticultural Council (AHC). The AHC accreditation ensures that horticultural programs are organized into well-defined curricula and have sound evaluations of student learning outcomes.

In 2002, the Horticulture Program was accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).

In 2007, the Horticulture Program was accredited by the Board of Professional Horticultural Education (BPHE). BPHE accreditation focuses on the programs offered and professional standards of practice for horticulture education.

In 2007, the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Horticulture Program opened its first satellite location in Southwestern Ohio at Tiffin University.

In 2007, the Horticulture Program introduced the Horticulture Technician Program to students interested in horticultural employment. The program gives students the option to acquire an associate degree in agriculture or a bachelor of science in agriculture.

In 2007, the Ohio Board of Regents approved a new Master's of Horticultural Science (MHS) program. The program, which is accredited by the BPHE, is designed to meet the growing need for professional horticulturalists.

2007-2012

In 2007, the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Horticulture Program launched a new Web-based graduate degree program in agricultural business. The program offers a degree in advanced business management for graduates who wish to work in the horticulture industry.

In 2007, The Ohio State University established a new Bachelor of Science in Horticultural Science.

In 2010, the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Horticulture Program opened a new branch in Stark County.

In 2010, the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Horticulture Program introduced new undergraduate and graduate degree programs: a Master's in Horticultural Therapy and a Master's in Landscape Management.

2011-2013

In 2011, the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Horticulture Program and the American Horticultural Society (AHS) began a joint study on the employment potential of horticulture-related careers.

In 2011, The Ohio State University and The University of Akron (UA) joined to launch a new bachelor's degree in landscape architecture and planning through the joint partnership.

In 2011, the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Horticulture Program completed a new $1 million facility for research and teaching, complete with greenhouse and greenhouses. The building offers both graduate and undergraduate degree programs in horticulture.

In 2013, The Ohio State University and The Ohio State University Extension (OSU) established the Bachelor of Science in Horticulture and Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering.

The Ohio State University and The Ohio State University Extension (OSU) established the bachelor's degree in Horticultural Management with the joint partnership.

Facilities

The Ohio State University's College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Horticulture Program has several facilities on campus including:

Campus

OSU Horticulture Greenhouses

The Ohio State University Horticulture Greenhouses at the OSU research farm offer a variety of outdoor and greenhouse produce. The horticulture greenhouses include:

Beechcroft Farms—the main greenhouses, including those for vegetables, flowers, herbs, berry, and tree fruit

Hocking Farms—a


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